Archive

Posts Tagged ‘swine flu map’

Swine Flu News – including the great killer fungus invasion

April 24th, 2010 No comments

Swine flu? What’s that? Today people are worrying more about the mysterious killer fungus (yep killer fungus) invading our shores than the swine flu H1N1 virus. “The fungus species triggering the infection is Cryptococcus gattii, which can cause pneumonia or meningitis.” Some would cite good reasons to worry more about this killer fungus instead of the swine flu. Evidence suggests that flu shots received in 1976 are largely effective against the recent swine flu virus. But while the swine flu pandemic appears to be over, the swine flu virus is still active. Check the swine flu map link above for the latest info on H1N1 activity.

H1N1 Swine Flu News Wrapup

June 15th, 2009 No comments
Table. U.S. Human of H1N1 Flu Infection
updated June 12, 2009,


States Confirmed and Probable Cases
States
Alabama
123
0
Alaska
11
0
Arkansas
13
0
Arizona
597
5
California
1094
6
Colorado
75
0
Connecticut
637
1
Delaware
187
0
Florida
417
0
Georgia
39
0
Hawaii
198
0
Idaho
29
0
Illinois
1983
5
Indiana
201
0
Iowa
92
0
Kansas
97
0
Kentucky
106
0
Louisiana
134
0
Maine
33
0
Maryland
139
0
Massachusetts
1078
0
Michigan
419
1
Minnesota
153
0
Mississippi
59
0
Missouri
46
1
Montana
27
0
Nebraska
71
0
Nevada
162
0
New Hampshire
92
0
New Jersey
348
0
New Mexico
155
0
New York
1160
13
North Carolina
61
0
North Dakota
31
0
Ohio
53
0
Oklahoma
93
0
Oregon
189
1
Pennsylvania
626
2
Rhode Island
62
0
South Carolina
60
0
South Dakota
14
1
Tennessee
110
0
Texas
2049
3
Utah
688
2
Vermont
32
0
Virginia
90
1
Washington
584
2
Washington, D.C.
33
0
West Virginia
40
0
Wisconsin
3008
1
Wyoming
50
0
TOTAL*(52)
17,855
45

Two weeks later and a three-fold increase in swine flu deaths in the United States. Compare the chart at right to the swine flu chart from just two weeks ago. Should you be worried? No. Should you educate yourself about swine flu and H1N1? Yes.

Europe’s first confirmed swine flu death – Sure, she was pregnant and had other health problems, but she’s dead from H1Ni. The good news? The baby does not have swine flu.

Swine flu widespread in England – Almost 1300 cases confirmed. When will the rest of Europe admit H1N1 has crossed the pond?

Swine flu becomes pandemic – It’s official, or at least it is if you look to the World Health Orginization (WHO) as a source of info. Swine flu is a global pandemic.

Boy Scouts not immune to swine flu – Reason #15 to avoid Jamborees.

CDC puts swine flu into perspective – Graphs, charts and soothing words make the pain go away

Swine flu map – Find the closest cases of swine flu near you.

Current US swine flu cases

The table to the right displays current swine flu cases in the US by state.

For international human cases of swine flu infection
please visit the World Health Organization web site.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number. *Total includes the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico

Swine Flu Threat Over?

May 22nd, 2009 No comments
Is the swine flu sky falling?

Is the swine flu sky falling?

“Now would be the worst time to kid ourselves that swine flu is nothing to worry about.” So say the editors of New Scientist in the most recent issue. (For the record, New Scientist is our favorite magazine of any sort, ever. Except maybe for Mad Magazine, when we were nine years old.)

So is this a swine flu scare tactic? Fear mongering? No. Even in the unlikely event that we’re lucky enough to say the worst of swine flu is behind us, our opening quote is sage advice. While we’ve started to receive the blog comment equivalent of hate mail, ostensibly for crying wolf and propagating the “swine flu myth”, the sad truth of the matter is this: Swine flu is still serious business.

Before you chastise this or any other swine flu information source, please research historical flu patterns. You’ll understand the wave-like pattern of past flu pandemics and even their smaller cousins, the less scary flu epidemic. Typically, there’s an early wave of flu infection. Then because of seasonality or whatever other reason, the flu outbreak subsides. All clear? Nope. Flu tends to return in a second wave, even stronger than before.

Other than the early cases in Mexico, swine flu turned out to be much less vicious than initially feared. But don’t count your chickens yet. Our swine flu luck could run out. The odds are 50/50 at best that Chicken Little is the idiot here. For all of our sakes, I hope the sky stays right where it is. In the meantime, expect more swine flu news from whatever we’re considering the trenches these days.

Click links above for swine flu news, swine flu maps and look around for past swine flu features. And seriously, subscribe to New Scientist.

Swine Flu Cases Mount

May 7th, 2009 4 comments

Click the image for a map of swine flu cases.

Click the image for a map of swine flu cases.

Swine flu cases are quickly approaching the one thousand milestone in the US as additional swine flu victims also mount in Mexico. The editors of New Scientist have called for a “ flu Manhattan project” in the face of a looming swine flu pandemic, noting the irony that it’s not an Asian bird flu prompting this alarming editorial.

What’s so hard about a swine flu Manhattan project? As usual, the devil’s in the corporate/government details. Preventing a swine flu pandemic can not be done unilaterally. This must be a whole-world effort to combat the next flu pandemic. Naturally, it comes down to dollars and cents, or yuan or whatever currencies we need to spend. Read the New Scientist article for more details.

Why was swine flu so much worse in Mexico?

In Mexico, there are more over the counter options to treat swine flu symptoms. Want antibiotics? No problem. They’re cheap and you don’t need a prescription. Additionally, though there’s a certain level  of state-run health care in Mexico, many residents aren’t near clinics and don’t have enough money to pay the nominal fee required for swine flu treatment.

This trend of avoiding treatment is exacerbated in the younger generations which were hit hard by swine flu. It’s not that swine flu is uncharacteristically killing the hearty youth, rather they’re avoiding medical help in lieu of home symptom treatment. The only two people to be killed by swine flu in the US were both weakened. One elderly, the other a baby.

The over the counter drugs and the recklessness of Mexican youth alone cannot explain the excessive swine flu deaths in Mexico. Elements of Mexican culture are also to blame. Did you know there are thousands of schools in Mexico without running water and bathrooms? It’s no wonder swine flu spread so quickly and became so deadly. Furthermore, Mexico City is one of the most crowded cities on the planet. Cramped conditions, poor medical policies and antiquated sanitation made (and continue to make) the perfect swine flu storm in Mexico.

Is all of Mexico like that?! No. There are plenty of places where there is no swine flu, like Cabo San Lucas. Why? There are restrooms in Cabo. The tap water is drinkable even by people from the US. And most importantly, it’s a desert… with a lot of tourist money flowing through its infrastructure veins. Who says money doesn’t solve big problems? Slap them. They’re wrong. Money fixes swine flu.

Visit the swine flu tracker swine flu map for the latest on swine flu news.

Swine Flu Update

May 6th, 2009 1 comment
Swine flu in Mexico, or a Michael Jackson video?

Swine flu in Mexico, or a Michael Jackson video?

Some are saying parts of Mexico look like a scene out of Michael Jackson’s Thriller video.

Dr. Richard E. Besser, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has bluntly stated: “As this moves forward, I fully expect that we will see deaths from this infection.” He’ was right. Tuesday marked the first domestic US death from swine flu. An earlier swine flu death in the United States originated in Mexico. The child died in the US when its caretakers brought it to Texas for treatment. In the same vein, (not to discount these tragic deaths,) the first domestic swine flu death was an elderly person with other health problems.

The one piece of encouraging news is that, outside of Mexico, swine flu victims can make a quick recovery if the illness is treated early. Of the thousands of suspected cases in Mexico, only about one thousand people remain hospitalized today, suggesting that the illness is very treatable if medical attention is sought in the early stages.

And though the initial spread of swine flu is by some accounts waning, experts predict that the northern hemispheres winter flu season will likely welcome a more virulent version of the H1N1 swine flu virus. Health organizations will pay close attention to the swine flu in the southern hemisphere in an effort to perfect a vaccine before the more populous northern flu season.

More good news. In an effort to halt or slow the spread of the swine flu, the World Health Organization (WHO) released 2.5 million doses of Tamiflu on Tuesday for distribution in developing countries.

See the swine flu tracker swine flu map page for more information on swine flu cases near you. Stay tuned for more swine flu updates.

China to Mexico Swine Flu Airlift

May 5th, 2009 No comments

Mexico has dispatched a plane (or planes) to China to collect the 70+ Mexican citizens who’ve been detained / quarantined due to swine flu fears.

Tensions are high in Mexico as both government officials and residents accuse China of inhumanely overreacting. China detained all Mexicans who shared a plane with the once passenger who tested positive for the H1N1 virus, the cause of swine flu.

Damned if you do. Damned if you don’t.

Surely you recall how just a few years ago China faced worldwide scorn for not taking serious steps to combat bird flu. Now they’re facing criticism for quarantining people in luxury hotels to prevent a swine flu pandemic. Would these critics be happy if China had done nothing?

One of the primary reasons we’re noticing some attenuation to the spread of swine flu is the responsible actions taken by some governments. Mexico closed sporting events because of bird flu. Texas halted school sporting events. China separated potential swine flu zombies from the general public. Just because none of them had swine flu does not make it a bad policy.

Swine flu updates

Check swine flu tracker’s swine flu map for the latest in swine flu cases near you.

Add to Technorati Favorites

Swine Flu Perspective

May 3rd, 2009 No comments
Will swine flu be a splash or a tsunami?

Will swine flu be a splash or a tsunami?

Time to put the current swine flu outbreak in its place. Though we might be seeing the beginning of a lull in the initial swine flu outbreak, flu experts predict the swine flu will continue to spread in the future, and will likely become much more prevalent in the 2009/2010 flu season. It is not uncommon for flu outbreaks to exhibit wave-like patterns. As we’ve no natural nor acquired immunity to this H1N1 strain, it could get ugly. How ugly?

This image puts swine flu into perspective. As recently as 40 years ago, over a million people died from a flu strain. That’s almost one in 3,000 people on the planet dead, a figure that belittles the current epidemic.

However, should scientists/governments/et al develop and manufacture enough reliable vaccine, this swine flu could remain a relatively mild flu outbreak. Unfortunately, manufacturing and distributing enough flu vaccine is challenging at best. What’s the motivation? Some say the a serious flu pandemic would hit the global economy to the tune of  more than three trillion dollars. ($3,000,000,000,000.00) That’s incentive.

Be sure to check the latest swine flu map. And become familiar with swine flu symptoms. Use the links at the top of this page.

Swine Flu Map Added to Swine Flu Tracker

April 30th, 2009 1 comment

Swine flu updates on the fly. You asked for it. Here it is. Click swine flu map above for more swine flu maps.

View 2009 H1N1 Flu Outbreak Map in a larger map

Stay tuned to swine flu tracker for more. If you have swine flu questions, post them in the comments to any post.

SEO Powered by Platinum SEO from Techblissonline